Lundi 8 août 1 08 /08 /Août 18:03

The development of Canada’s oil sands will single-handedly undo greenhouse gas gains made by weaning the country’s electrical supply off coal, a government study predicts.

The Environment Canada forecast of Canada’s carbon output over the next decade casts in stark terms the challenge facing the country as it pursues major energy development at a time of continued global efforts to bat down emissions.

 

More related to this story

 

The report, called Canada’s Emissions Trends, was released quietly in July. It tracks changes in greenhouse gas output for a number of sectors between 2005 and 2020.

Over that period, it projects that electricity generators will see their emissions fall by 31 megatonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent, largely as a result of coal-fired plants giving way to natural gas-fired power.

But that figure is far eclipsed by the oil sands, which will see carbon output rise by 62 megatonnes, tripling its 2005 levels. Of that, 25 megatonnes will come from new so-called “in situ” extraction methods that inject steam into underground wells to extract oil sands crude. A further 11 megatonnes will come from expansion of oil sands mining. The rest is expected from additional upgrading, a process used to transform the thick, heavy oil sands bitumen into a lighter crude that can then be refined into end products like diesel and gasoline.

Over all, the oil and gas sector will see its emissions rise by 46 megatonnes, after taking into account expected reductions from pipelines, refining and the production of non-oil-sands crudes.

In total, Environment Canada expects the country’s greenhouse gas emissions to rise by 54 megatonnes, as other sectors, including transportation, buildings and agriculture, also see increases.

But the massive gains in oil sands emissions output are perhaps the most remarkable figures in the report.

“This is the first time we’ve seen just exactly the difference between the different sectors, and just how out of line the oil sands emissions are,” said Simon Dyer, policy director at the Pembina Institute.

Mr. Dyer points out that, by 2020, the oil sands will account for 12 per cent of national emissions. “That’s more than any province other than Alberta and Ontario, and is 40 per cent more than Quebec’s total projected emissions in 2020,” he said.

By 2020, Canada is expected to exceed its carbon output targets by 178 megatonnes, or nearly 30 per cent.

Industry, however, argues that technological advances are likely to make the Environment Canada estimates too high.

“You’ll see some significant reductions going ahead,” Steve Laut, president of Canadian Natural Resources Ltd., said in an interview. He pointed to a new system under development at the company’s Horizon oil sands mine that will see carbon captured from one of its plants and buried with liquid mine waste.

That alone will provide “up to a 20-per-cent reduction” in per-barrel emissions, Mr. Laut said.

Alberta, which is home to virtually all of the country’s oil sands development, has also worked to defend – and insulate – its biggest industry against greenhouse gas legislation. The province charges companies that exceed certain targets $15 a tonne for carbon output – but in an interview, Energy Minister Ron Liepert said Alberta does not want to see Canada meet its commitments to international greenhouse-gas-reduction protocols.

“I’m not interested in Kyoto-style policies. That’s something that was the previous Liberal government. We’re working with the current government to ensure that we do what we can, but at the same time we’re not going to cripple the Canadian economy,” he said.

Mr. Liepert pointed to industry efforts to reduce per-barrel emissions, although those efforts pale in comparison with the rapid expansion of the oil sands, which is seeking to double its crude production over the next decade.

Mr. Liepert argued the oil sands are too important to be slowed. He pointed to last week’s economic numbers, which saw Alberta create 12,000 jobs, making it one of only two provinces to show employment gains.

“You might want to take a look at who is fuelling the Canadian economy right now,” he said. “If we didn’t have the resource base of Western Canada, we’d be in exactly the same [situation] as the U.S. is in.”

Environmental groups, however, say the rise in oil sands emissions poses numerous problems. Not only could it create regional strife – should Alberta, for example, be allowed to use up the country’s carbon allowance while other areas achieve reductions? – but critics argue that industry itself could suffer from major emissions gains.

Mr. Dyer pointed to delays in the U.S. over approval of the Keystone XL pipeline, which have stemmed in part from concerns over rising oil sands emissions, and to efforts in Europe to legislate against oil-sands-derived crude.

“Canada’s failure to act on greenhouse gas pollution is starting to be an economic liability,” he said.

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/oil-sands-expected-to-undo-carbon-cuts/article2122227/

 

 

Par Greenpeace ville de Québec - Publié dans : Divers
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Lundi 8 août 1 08 /08 /Août 18:03

The development of Canada’s oil sands will single-handedly undo greenhouse gas gains made by weaning the country’s electrical supply off coal, a government study predicts.

The Environment Canada forecast of Canada’s carbon output over the next decade casts in stark terms the challenge facing the country as it pursues major energy development at a time of continued global efforts to bat down emissions.

 

More related to this story

 

The report, called Canada’s Emissions Trends, was released quietly in July. It tracks changes in greenhouse gas output for a number of sectors between 2005 and 2020.

Over that period, it projects that electricity generators will see their emissions fall by 31 megatonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent, largely as a result of coal-fired plants giving way to natural gas-fired power.

But that figure is far eclipsed by the oil sands, which will see carbon output rise by 62 megatonnes, tripling its 2005 levels. Of that, 25 megatonnes will come from new so-called “in situ” extraction methods that inject steam into underground wells to extract oil sands crude. A further 11 megatonnes will come from expansion of oil sands mining. The rest is expected from additional upgrading, a process used to transform the thick, heavy oil sands bitumen into a lighter crude that can then be refined into end products like diesel and gasoline.

Over all, the oil and gas sector will see its emissions rise by 46 megatonnes, after taking into account expected reductions from pipelines, refining and the production of non-oil-sands crudes.

In total, Environment Canada expects the country’s greenhouse gas emissions to rise by 54 megatonnes, as other sectors, including transportation, buildings and agriculture, also see increases.

But the massive gains in oil sands emissions output are perhaps the most remarkable figures in the report.

“This is the first time we’ve seen just exactly the difference between the different sectors, and just how out of line the oil sands emissions are,” said Simon Dyer, policy director at the Pembina Institute.

Mr. Dyer points out that, by 2020, the oil sands will account for 12 per cent of national emissions. “That’s more than any province other than Alberta and Ontario, and is 40 per cent more than Quebec’s total projected emissions in 2020,” he said.

By 2020, Canada is expected to exceed its carbon output targets by 178 megatonnes, or nearly 30 per cent.

Industry, however, argues that technological advances are likely to make the Environment Canada estimates too high.

“You’ll see some significant reductions going ahead,” Steve Laut, president of Canadian Natural Resources Ltd., said in an interview. He pointed to a new system under development at the company’s Horizon oil sands mine that will see carbon captured from one of its plants and buried with liquid mine waste.

That alone will provide “up to a 20-per-cent reduction” in per-barrel emissions, Mr. Laut said.

Alberta, which is home to virtually all of the country’s oil sands development, has also worked to defend – and insulate – its biggest industry against greenhouse gas legislation. The province charges companies that exceed certain targets $15 a tonne for carbon output – but in an interview, Energy Minister Ron Liepert said Alberta does not want to see Canada meet its commitments to international greenhouse-gas-reduction protocols.

“I’m not interested in Kyoto-style policies. That’s something that was the previous Liberal government. We’re working with the current government to ensure that we do what we can, but at the same time we’re not going to cripple the Canadian economy,” he said.

Mr. Liepert pointed to industry efforts to reduce per-barrel emissions, although those efforts pale in comparison with the rapid expansion of the oil sands, which is seeking to double its crude production over the next decade.

Mr. Liepert argued the oil sands are too important to be slowed. He pointed to last week’s economic numbers, which saw Alberta create 12,000 jobs, making it one of only two provinces to show employment gains.

“You might want to take a look at who is fuelling the Canadian economy right now,” he said. “If we didn’t have the resource base of Western Canada, we’d be in exactly the same [situation] as the U.S. is in.”

Environmental groups, however, say the rise in oil sands emissions poses numerous problems. Not only could it create regional strife – should Alberta, for example, be allowed to use up the country’s carbon allowance while other areas achieve reductions? – but critics argue that industry itself could suffer from major emissions gains.

Mr. Dyer pointed to delays in the U.S. over approval of the Keystone XL pipeline, which have stemmed in part from concerns over rising oil sands emissions, and to efforts in Europe to legislate against oil-sands-derived crude.

“Canada’s failure to act on greenhouse gas pollution is starting to be an economic liability,” he said.

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/oil-sands-expected-to-undo-carbon-cuts/article2122227/

 

 

Par Greenpeace ville de Québec - Publié dans : Divers
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Lundi 8 août 1 08 /08 /Août 18:02

Aujourd’hui, Greenpeace exige l’ouverture d’une enquête concernant le sort réservé à ses militants, l’été dernier, par les agents de correction du Centre de détention provisoire de Calgary.

Devant le palais de justice de Calgary, Mike Hudema, responsable de la campagne Climat et énergie de Greenpeace, annonce avoir demandé l’ouverture d’une enquête, la prise de mesures disciplinaires et que des accusations soient portées au criminel contre les responsables. Greenpeace a déposé une plainte concernant les agents de correction auprès de la Commission des droits de la personne de l'Alberta, ainsi qu’à la personne responsable du centre de détention provisoire.

« Les agents de correction du Centre de détention provisoire de Calgary ont menacé de viol et d’agression des militants pacifiques en voie d’être relâchés afin de les intimider, » dit Mike Hudema. « Ils ont conduit plusieurs fouilles à nue agressives en guise de mesure punitive et usé de diffamation antifrancophone contre un militant. Ce comportement est un affront direct à la Charte canadienne des droits, à la justice et envers chaque citoyen qui respecte la démocratie. Ce comportement provenant d’agents de l’état est inacceptable. De plus, nous croyons qu’une enquête démontrera que des accusations doivent être portées au criminel. »

Neuf militants de Greenpeace ont été arrêtés le 3 août 2010. Ils manifestaient de façon pacifique à la tour de Calgary où ils ont suspendu une banderole indiquant « Separate Oil and State (Séparons le pétrole et l'État). » Après à une détention de plus de 30 heures, ils ont été transférés et détenus au Centre de détention provisoire de Calgary pendant plusieurs heures durant les procédures de libération sous caution.

Greenpeace décrit les accusations portées contre les agents du Centre de détention suite au traitement réservé à ses militants, incluant les avoir :

  • menacés de briser leurs os,
  • soumis à des fouilles à nue humiliantes et anticonstitutionnelles,
  • menacés de les faire attaquer par les chiens de garde,
  • intimidés verbalement lorsqu’ils ont exercé leur droit de demeurer silencieux,
  • menacés de les enfermer avec d’autres détenus qui les violeraient, et en avoir enfermés certains avec des détenus menaçants,
  • menacés de sévices par d’autres détenus et
  • menacés de mort subtilement en leur demandant qui contacter en cas de décès.

Les militants ont été libérés sous caution, ont suivi les procédures de remise en liberté, ont été détenus pendant plus de 30 heures et ont été fouillés par la police. Il est donc flagrant que les actions de ces agents de correction – en particulier la fouille à nue – ne servaient qu’à les humilier davantage. La Cour suprême du Canada a clairement indiqué que l’usage de la fouille à nue doit être limité et réglementé.

« Nos accusations ont été rendues publiques, car ce comportement est généralisé dans le Centre de détention provisoire. Cette façon de faire réduit les droits de contestation des gens manifestant de façon pacifique contre les politiques gouvernementales, » dit Mike Hudema. « Nous jetons le blâme sur le Premier ministre Stelmach. Lorsque le premier ministre intervient auprès du système juridique et demande que la loi soit utilisée en son plein contre les militants pacifiques de Greenpeace, Stelmach crée une situation potentiellement dangereuse pouvant mener à de l’abus envers des manifestants pacifiques. Depuis, nous avons les autorités de l’Alberta qui ont déployé l’arsenal lourd pour faire taire et restreindre ceux qui s’opposent à une industrie pétrolière qui est complètement hors de contrôle. »

Plus tôt aujourd’hui, Greenpeace remit une lettre à Kim Canning, directeur du Centre de détention provisoire de Calgary. Nous exigeons l’ouverture d’une enquête quant aux mauvais traitements infligés aux militants. De plus, les agents doivent être soumis à des mesures disciplinaires incluant, si nécessaire, des accusations au criminel. Greenpeace a aussi soumis une requête auprès de la Commission des droits de la personne à Edmonton concernant la diffamation antifrancophone. Un agent du centre de détention a conclu son interrogatoire en disant: « Tu sais pas qu’ici on n’aime pas les francophones? » Les trois francophones sont de Montréal.

« J’ai été menacé de viol. On m’a demandé si je voulais qu’on me brise les os et j’ai vu un collègue se faire hurler dans les oreilles parce qu’il était francophone, » dit Fred Bleau, militant de Greenpeace au Québec. « Les accusations portées contre moi ont été retirées pour manque de preuves, mais on m’a tout de même traité de façon abusive. Ce genre de traitement inapproprié envers les gens doit cesser. »
 
 
http://www.greenpeace.org/canada/fr/Blog/tu-sais-pas-quici-on-naime-pas-les-francophon/blog/36222/

 

 

http://gaiapresse.ca/fr/articles/article.php?id=31422&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

 

 

Par Greenpeace ville de Québec - Publié dans : Greenpeace
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Lundi 8 août 1 08 /08 /Août 17:33

     

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REN21

 

211 milliards de dollars d'investissements dans le monde pour une transition positive vers une économie verte sobre en carbone et économe en ressources, dans le contexte de développement durable et d'éradication de la pauvreté.

Le Rapport mondial sur les énergies renouvelables de REN21 (Renewables 2011 Global Status Report) publié le 12 juillet 2011 relève quelques principaux faits saillants :

-  Le secteur de l'énergie renouvelable continue d'obtenir de bons résultats malgré la poursuite de la récession économique, la réduction des incitations et la faiblesse du cours du gaz naturel.

En 2010, les énergies renouvelables ont fourni, selon les estimations, 16 % de la consommation finale d'énergie à l'échelle de la planète et presque 20 % de l'électricité mondiale. La capacité en électricité renouvelable représente maintenant environ un quart de la capacité totale de production d'électricité mondiale.

- L'énergie solaire photovoltaïque a plus que doublé grâce à la baisse des coûts.

- En 2010, la capacité installée de solaire thermique pour le chauffage et l'eau chaude sanitaire a crû de 25 GWth soit environ 16%.

- Les investissements mondiaux dans les énergies renouvelables ont bondi de plus de 30 % pour atteindre un niveau record de 211 milliards USD.

- La part des économies émergentes et en voie de développement augmente en termes de politiques, d'investissements, d'approvisionnement et d'utilisation.

- REN21 lance également sa carte interactive des énergies renouvelables qui est un outil pratique et simple pour collecter et partager des informations en ligne au sujet du développement des énergies renouvelables. 

Pour en savoir plus :
UNEP

Pour télécharger le rapport
du PNUE sur Les Tendances mondiales de l'investissement dans les énergies renouvelables 2011 (Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2011)
Découvrez les actions Climat/Energie de la Fondation
Selon le GIEC, les énergies renouvelables fourniront l'essentiel de l'énergie d'ici 2050
Sortie du nucléaire en Allemagne : Où iront-ils chercher leur éléctricité ?
Quelles places pour les énergies renouvelables dans le système énergétique français ?

 

 

http://johannafondationnaturehomme.visibli.com/share/ZYFt8j

 

 

 

Par Greenpeace ville de Québec - Publié dans : Énergies alternatives
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Dimanche 7 août 7 07 /08 /Août 22:09

 

Strawberry girlImage: Lily MihalikIn 1950, your parents, grandparents, or a perhaps a younger version of you could eat a handful of string beans -- about three-and-a-half ounces -- and get about 9 percent of the calcium you needed for the day. Almost 50 years later, in 1999, the amount of calcium in string beans dropped by 43 percent, leaving you with only 5 percent of your daily calcium. You could eat more string beans -- except you might not want to, because they wouldn't be as flavorful as in the past. So you could eat more of other vegetables, but it's likely other vegetables wouldon't have as much calcium or flavor as they used to, either. And it's not just calcium: Preliminary research shows that many vegetables have lost significant amounts of nutritional value.

Donald Davis, a scientist retired from the University of Texas at Austin, and his colleagues published a study in 2004 comparing U.S. Department of Agriculture data on vegetable nutrients from 1950 to data from 1999, and found notable decreases, particularly for key nutrients like calcium, iron, phosphorus, riboflavin, and ascorbic acid.

Davis believes that the primary reason for the decrease is selective breeding: As growers and researchers have spent the last 50 years trying to produce varieties of crops that yield more fruit, they've been ignoring the effects on nutrient content. Davis cites a few studies that compared high-yield varieties to non-high-yield varieties in the same soil and growing conditions, and found decreased nutrient content in the former.

"It's early evidence, but that's very powerful evidence because the soil is the same; the only difference is the genetics of the plant," Davis says.

The studies show that as fruits and vegetables get bigger and more plentiful, nutrients get diluted. Some high-yield varieties are "dwarf" plants, meaning the plants themselves are smaller. But plants draw in and store minerals in their stalks, and when it comes time to create a fruit or vegetable, the plants extract the minerals and transform them into beneficial nutrients in the fruit. A lack of storage space for nutrients in the stalk translates to a loss of nutrients in the fruits. (Because taste is so subjective, not much research has been done flavor loss in high-yield varieties. But some people anecdotally claim that flavors in high-yield varieties also seem diluted compared to heirlooms -- varieties that have been passed down, unaltered, through generations.)

Though Davis believes the issue is a serious problem, he cautions against panic. Nutrient depletion pales as a threat when compared to other aspects of the American diet -- namely, our preference for refined sugar, fats, oils, and refined grains over fruits and veggies in the first place.

"This is just one more reason to eat more of our current fruits and vegetables, because they're still our best source of many nutrients even after this apparent decline," he says.

For those who want to grow their own food, Davis recommends looking for heirloom and non-hybrid varieties of plants, which may not yield as much food, but are probably more nutritious, and possibly more flavorful.

"Some of the best flavor tomatoes that I know of that I've grown at home are the little ones, the littler cherry tomatoes," he says.

How much have our nutrients been depleted? Check out this infographic showing the changes in nutritional content of a few common vegetables:

Natalie Jones is a News21 fellow and graduate student in journalism and public health at the University of California, Berkeley. She covers the intersection of food, agriculture, policy, and the environment.
Par Greenpeace ville de Québec - Publié dans : Divers
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